The Storm's Second Light | My Family Travels
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The imminently haunting clouds of an incoming storm juxtaposed with the crystalline waters of Lake Michigan caused me an internal connection to my surroundings. In this divine environment composed of Mother Nature’s songs of love and peace, an outside force intruded this serenity without restraint. A storm, free from the control of mankind, was sliding in to override my elegant view of the coastline during my stay in Traverse City, Michigan.

My initial reaction was like that of any individual bothered by any unwanted third party; I was disappointed. Plans for a relaxing holiday now crumbled as unpleasant weather would utterly ruin the day before me. Upon arrival, my parents and I unpacked our belongings in our hotel and were scheduled for a tour of the coast. The quick glimpse I caught in the early morning hours filled me with awe, inspiration, and ultimately anticipation for the itinerary I was set to follow. Exposing myself to new sights and a culture outside of the world I know would hopefully allow me to grow in my ideals of humanity. Being able to understand the difference between separate groups of individuals could shed a light on new ideas which could change the world whereas continuing to live as an empty drone in my routine life keeps new concepts and people hidden in the shadows of the unknown.
 
To my dismay, the sights, people, and culture were not sources for newfound discoveries. Not even the pristine beaches of which I have dreamed to visit for months caused my self-realization. As I stared at the rich teal coloration of the waters, I felt bliss of which I have never felt before this moment. Even though I felt a connection, the relationship was, in reality, only surface deep. As I left the waters, this feeling crept away as a snail from its old shell. The awe I recently experienced was gone, and I immediately felt wasteful for not trying to create a lasting memory. I was left with my mind which felt as though I have never left my daily routine on a special venture to Michigan.
 
It was on the second day when I stumbled across my revolutionary feeling of attachment and belonging to the world. After going through dark months tirelessly working and living in my typical surroundings, I had an incredible desire to feel something new. The storm provided these emotions. It took a massive thunderstorm which had the potential of ruining my day to create my internal realization. Pouring over me like leaking spouting, I realized that the focus in life did not necessarily rely on planning. Spontaneous change keeps the human mind engaged and alert which enables active learning. Falling into a constant routine and merely hoping for a brighter future will set extraordinarily high expectations for the days to come. Rather, one must relish in the simple things in life. The changes, the surprises, and the new experiences are the roots of happiness in this short time span in which we live.
 
A storm, a metaphor for interruption in routine, acts as a new focus for which new connections can be made. Averting to ideas outside of “the norm” will connect people, ideas, and places. Viewing this concept firsthand through a storm on Lake Michigan was a natural experience. Although it was a simple idea, it may be difficult to grasp without a real-life example by which one can understand. The storm on Lake Michigan provided a new meaning and a new light which wholesomely taught me a lesson through our natural world.

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One Reply to “The Storm’s Second Light”

  • batmandude123

    My essay describes the emotional connection to the effects of a storm which would seemingly ruins a trip to Lake Michigan.

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