Taj Mahal: A Monument of Love | My Family Travels
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Love is universal. Love is priceless. Love is timeless.

 

            In modern times, it is easy to express your love by sending chocolate or a rose bouquet.  But history has presented lovers that have gone far beyond others to declare their love and left examples that made their love immortal. Most have heard the love stories of Adam & Eve, Romeo & Juliet, and many others but one that may exceed all of these is the story of Shahjehan and Mumtaj.

 

As a prince in the Mughal Dynasty, Shahjehan fell in love with Mumtaj Mahal. After courtship of over five years, the king Shah Jehan married her. During the twenty years they were married, Mumtaj often sacrificed the comforts of palaces to take care of Shahjehan.  During the final moments of Mumtaj’s life, who died at an early age, a distraught Shahjehan promised to leave a symbol of their true love. Shahjehan fulfilled his promise, as only a true emperor could do, by building a mausoleum in her memory and naming it the Taj Mahal. Even after three hundred and fifty years, it remains one of the most beautiful buildings on the planet.

 

As my family planned for the trip, I heard a lot about the history and beauty of the Taj Mahal. It became my dream to experience its beauty of the Taj Mahal myself. Hence, I made sure to reserve one day for the Taj Mahal.

 

My family arrived in India late June, a part of the year that brought rain every day. After spending a few weeks traveling around India and enjoying time with my relative, the day to see the Taj Mahal came.

 

After paying the entrance fee and clearing the security checks, I was led inside the Taj through well fortified walls and structures that provide a striking approach to the mausoleum. The next moment I was facing the Taj Mahal.

 

That moment is indescribable. I was still. I was spellbound. I was not facing just a building of marble and stones. It was, in fact, the ultimate symbol of love for mankind.

 

At first glimpse, I was convinced that the beauty shown in Taj Mahal pictures was a lie. No picture in the world could truly depict the beauty of the Taj Mahal. Yet, as I walked towards the Taj Mahal, I noticed everything was not perfect. The bricks had turned a slight shade of yellow due to age; the pool had no water because it was being renovated; it was especially crowded, though maybe that was normal. Still, the beauty of the Taj Mahal shone through these flaws.

 

As I toured the grounds and the Taj Mahal itself, I couldn’t believe the amount of love that Jehan must have had for Mumtaj to build something so great in her memory. It had taken twenty-two years of continuous work from twenty thousand workers, a thousand elephants and materials brought from areas around the world. By the end, the varied materials, the sweat of the workers, and immense planning led to the gorgeous Taj Mahal that I had the pleasure of seeing.

 

The following hours I spent at the Taj Mahal were pure bliss. I saw the colors change from white to golden. I saw the jewels inlaid on the white marble sparkle in the bright light. I saw the elaborate tombs inside the monument. I saw the Taj Mahal.

 

Even today, when I close my eyes and remember the Taj Mahal, its beauty resurfaces. It reminds me, our world is a wonderful place where hatred will always be overcome by love. Truly, love is timeless.

 

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