Big Things Come in Small Packages: The Island of Barbados | My Family Travels
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My trip to Barbados in the summer of 2011 was without a doubt, one of the best trips I have ever experienced in my life. Barbados, the birth country of super-star Rihanna, the well-known cricketer Sir Garry Sobers, as well as the birthplace of my own father, is praised for its beaches, nature, and overall friendly atmosphere.

For three weeks, I basked in the summer heat, walking along the rocky shore of Bathsheba, admiring the beauty of the area: the calm waters slithering through the smallest cracks and crevices and into little craters in the rocks and sand, serving as a little basin for silver dollars and baby fish obliviously caught in the current. At high tide, a handful of surfers, ranging from young natives of the island to curious tourists from all parts of the world, take on the mighty waves, either riding victoriously back to the shore, or losing balance and falling into the wild waters.

Back on land, crabs of all colors and sizes scuttle sideways across the path, their beady eyes darting back and forth, taking note of any possible threats. Those brave enough lift their tiny, little claws and dance from left to right, looking to start a fight. Over the hill, people walk through the streets. Whether they are tourists or natives, there is always such a welcoming vibe that envelopes the beautiful rural countryside and beckons you to take part in the small, close-knit community. Walking along the country, I realize that long ago, my father was just about my age, looking off into the same views that I do at this moment. Wading into the same waters. Taking on the same waves. Being here gives me a glimpse of where my father spent his childhood years and how his childhood contrasts to mine.

A short drive away is Rocklee Beach. With its crystal-clear waters and pure white sandy shore, it is a popular spot for tourists and Barbadians alike. Further off is the capitol of Bridgetown: a large complex with hordes of stores that’ll satisfy any visitor’s needs. Aromas of fried fish, sweet plantain, and other Barbadian cuisines linger through the busy city, while buses zoom past the jewelry stores and souvenir shops. Just a few steps away from the bus station is a crowded market, which adds to the non-stop commotion. The various calls of vendors pierce through the cacophonic songs of the city, drowning out the drones of cars and buses passing by.

Further down south is the Silver Sands. The area is adorned with gorgeous flower shrubs and thick trees. Underneath the tree’s tangled roots, crabs as small as your thumb and as big as your palm, and the occasional mongoose curiously peep out of their refuge and hastily grab whatever remnants from the last picnic still linger on the ground. Beyond the park’s steep slope, you’ll see why Silver Sands earned its name. The ocean glistens as the sun shines down on it, and the wave crash onto the uniformly colored, sandy shore. In the nighttime, everyone packs their things and heads to the fields, where they enjoy a game of cricket or soccer, without a care in the world.

Going to Barbados has given me an opportunity to take a break from the urban lifestyle. The island may be small in size, but not in spirit. Being in such a mellow, sociable atmosphere with so much friendly people and beautiful nature gave me a time to unwind from all the boisterous activity here in New York City and allow me to unwind in the never-ending paradise. 

Here is the link to Harrison's Cave in Barbados.

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