Moloka'i: the island where Hawaiian culture grows | My Family Travels
MOLOKAI
MOLOKAI

   Hawaii is known for its stunning scenery and intriguing culture. Living on Kauai is phenomenal, but I now know that you can never fully experience Hawaii unless you visit Moloka’i.

   I recently went to Moloka’i so I could learn more about the Hawaiian culture. Descending from Hawaiian heritage myself I was so proud to learn more about the where I come from. Hearing stories about sacred places and my Hawaiian ancestors gave me a better respect for my Hawaiian culture. Learning the same oli or songs that were sung by the Hawaiians of old helped me further understand who I am as a Hawaiian.

   Over the course of a week I met new people who were Hawaiian- just like me, and just as appreciative to learn more about their culture. Together, we went to some of the most sacred places on Moloka’i. From the chilly, mystic hilltop known as Ka’ana- the place where hula dancing started- to the humid kukui grove of Lanikaula.

   Going to all these sacred places was a unique opportunity so I made the most of it because I will most likely never get the privilege to visit them again. Being on Molokai opened up a new way of looking at the world. I realized how intelligent the Hawaiians were and that they preserved the land for the future. They also cared for everything around them; The Aina, or land; the Kai, or ocean; and most of all the future generations of native Hawaiians. Going to Moloka’i made me so proud of where I come from and now I truly understand who I am as a Hawaiian.

Dear Reader: This page may contain affiliate links which may earn a commission if you click through and make a purchase. Our independent journalism is not influenced by any advertiser or commercial initiative unless it is clearly marked as sponsored content. As travel products change, please be sure to reconfirm all details and stay up to date with current events to ensure a safe and successful trip.

One Reply to “Moloka’i: the island where Hawaiian culture grows”

  • Anonymous

    Thank you for this article Kahi. I grew up on Molokai, so it’s nice to see another’s warm and true reflection. Mahalo.

Comment on this article

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.